Costumes for Murder Mystery Games set in the Edwardian era

Clothes make a statement. Costumes tell a story.
— Mason Cooley
Murder Mystery Games Logo

Edwardian Icons

Edward VII. Lillie Langtry. Emily Pankhurst. Gertrude Jekyll. Edward Elgar. Robert Baden-Powell. Louis Bleriot. Beatrix Potter. Marie Curie. Marie Lloyd. 

Female attire is generally more relaxed than in Victorian times. Fabrics are softer and there is less use of boning in how the clothes are constructed. 

Loose-fitting tea-gowns and bustle-free skirts make walking easier, but many dresses now have a long train trailing behind them. And just when women are getting more outdoorsy and sporty, along comes the hobble skirt.

During murder mystery parties, women can move around a lot as they question other people about the murder, so avoid being hobbled, restrain that train and, as long as it suits your character, settle for a long skirt and shirtwaist blouse or tea-gown instead.

  • Any colour is fine, as long as it is white.  
  • His Majesty’s love of the fuller figure means that curves are back in. S-shaped is good: bosom pushed forward, bottom pushed back.
  • Remember: sashes aren’t just for Suffragettes, belts are commonplace, too.
  • Sleeves come in many different forms: everything from leg-of-mutton to no sleeve at all.
  • Fancy hats are a must. Wide-brimmed, often with the brim up-turned.
  • Long cloaks and short capes are now taking over from shawls.
  • For the truly independent and adventurous: duster coats and long scarves. The sort of thing you might also wear while driving your brand new horseless carriage.
  • Scalloped necklines. Mesh gloves. Lace-up granny boots.

Costumes for Edwardian Men

You no longer have to suffer to look respectable. Three-piece lounge suits and loose-fitting sack suits with rounded, turned down collars are now OK. You can put that top hat to one side and wear a straw boater instead. But, if you prefer formality, then the old favourites are still fine. For instance, a morning coat with striped trousers, white shirt and a starched, detachable collar.

  • There aren’t many options for you, if you aren’t a “gentleman”. Unless you are in your Sunday best suit, settle for string-tied baggy trousers, a cloth cap, a rough shirt and waistcoat and big, clumpy boots
  • A Norfolk jacket with matching knickerbockers, a plain shirt and tie and long socks and Oxford shoes or knee-length boots. 
  • You no longer have to suffer to look respectable. Three-piece lounge suits and loose-fitting sack suits with rounded, turned down collars are now OK. You can put that top hat to one side and wear a straw boater instead. But, if you prefer formality, then the old favourites are still fine. For instance, a morning coat with striped trousers, white shirt and a starched, detachable collar.
  • There aren’t many options for you, if you aren’t a “gentleman”. Unless you are in your Sunday best suit, settle for string-tied baggy trousers, a cloth cap, a rough shirt and waistcoat and big, clumpy boots
  • A Norfolk jacket with matching knickerbockers, a plain shirt and tie and long socks and Oxford shoes or knee-length boots. 

Murder Mystery Games that can be set in the Edwardian era


Other Costume Eras